applebyenvironmental@aol.com
01670 530799
07989 096676

JAPANESE KNOTWEED

‘Fallopia japonica’  

HOW TO IDENTIFY JAPANESE KNOTWEED

Unfortunately eradicating japanese knotweed is not an overnight process, but we deal with it as efficiently as possible at a competitive price. The first stage is the initial survey of your problem, what you need done and how we can help, as well as doing an assessment on the environmental impact of your proposed treatment. After the initial treatment has been carried out an action plan will be put into place with follow up inspections and treatments where necessary for the following two growing seasons; this will ensure complete eradication of the Japanese Knotweed.
These photographs show a residential property which we treated for Japanese Knotweed, showing before, during and after treatment. A two year inspection plan was put into place to ensure the plant did not return.

ERADICATING JAPANESE KNOTWEED

Throughout the months of February and March red buds begin to emerge from the crown of the plant, these then develop into shoots which maintain a red appearance with folded leaves. This is when the maturing stems are hollow and similar to bamboo. The canes are green with red speckles and rapidly grow throughout the spring and summer. During Spring the newly expanded leaves are yellow/green in colour and become darker as they mature through the summer, which alternate along the stem to form a zigzag pattern.

JAPANESE KNOTWEED AND THE LAW

Japanese knotweed pictures Spring Japanese knotweed pictures Summer
August to October is when the plant flowers; towards the end of the growing season when small, white flowers are produced where the leaves join the stems.
Japanese knotweed pictures Autumn
Japanese Knotweed can be easy to identify but is difficult to eradicate. Usually a tall plant, light green in colour with triangular shaped leaves and red hollow stems which are similar to bamboo. Japanese Knotweed can be incredibly destructive, often causing damage to roads, buildings and concrete.
Appleby Environmental Services logo
Japanese Knotweed as with all invasive weeds is covered by Schedule 9 Section 14 of the Countryside and Wildlife Act 1981. Under this act it is an offence to plant or cause Japanese Knotweed to grow in the wild, this is enforced by the police and local authorities. All parts of Japanese Knotweed including soil and waste containing the weed is classed as controlled waste and must be removed by a licence waste carrier in line with The Environmental Protection Act 1990. Appleby Environmental Services Ltd are licensed waste carriers.
At the end of Autumn the leaves begin to turn yellow/brown in colour and drop to reveal feathered branches from the remaining flowers. Hollow canes shed to reveal a lighter smooth cane which is quite brittle.
Japanese Knotweed Fallopia japonica is a fast growing strong perennial which was introduced to the UK from Japan in the 19th Century. It is often found widespread across roadside verges, riverbanks, woodland and towns and gardens.
Appleby Environmental Services Ltd specialise in the chemical treatment of Japanese knotweed through the methods of herbicidal spray and stem injection.

Invasive Weed Control     Ecological Contractors      Vegetation Clearance

01670 530799
07989 096676

JAPANESE KNOTWEED

‘Fallopia japonica’  

HOW TO IDENTIFY JAPANESE

KNOTWEED

Unfortunately eradicating japanese knotweed is not an overnight process, but we deal with it as efficiently as possible at a competitive price. The first stage is the initial survey of your problem, what you need done and how we can help, as well as doing an assessment on the environmental impact of your proposed treatment. After the initial treatment has been carried out an action plan will be put into place with follow up inspections and treatments where necessary for the following two growing seasons; this will ensure complete eradication of the Japanese Knotweed.
These photographs show a residential property which we treated for Japanese Knotweed, showing before, during and after treatment. A two year inspection plan was put into place to ensure the plant did not return.

ERADICATING JAPANESE

KNOTWEED

Throughout the months of February and March red buds begin to emerge from the crown of the plant, these then develop into shoots which maintain a red appearance with folded leaves. This is when the maturing stems are hollow and similar to bamboo. The canes are green with red speckles and rapidly grow throughout the spring and summer. During Spring the newly expanded leaves are yellow/green in colour and become darker as they mature through the summer, which alternate along the stem to form a zigzag pattern.

JAPANESE KNOTWEED AND THE

LAW

Japanese knotweed pictures Spring Japanese knotweed pictures Summer
August to October is when the plant flowers; towards the end of the growing season when small, white flowers are produced where the leaves join the stems.
Japanese knotweed pictures Autumn
Japanese Knotweed can be easy to identify but is difficult to eradicate. Usually a tall plant, light green in colour with triangular shaped leaves and red hollow stems which are similar to bamboo. Japanese Knotweed can be incredibly destructive, often causing damage to roads, buildings and concrete.
Appleby Environmental Services logo
Japanese Knotweed as with all invasive weeds is covered by Schedule 9 Section 14 of the Countryside and Wildlife Act 1981. Under this act it is an offence to plant or cause Japanese Knotweed to grow in the wild, this is enforced by the police and local authorities. All parts of Japanese Knotweed including soil and waste containing the weed is classed as controlled waste and must be removed by a licence waste carrier in line with The Environmental Protection Act 1990. Appleby Environmental Services Ltd are licensed waste carriers.
At the end of Autumn the leaves begin to turn yellow/brown in colour and drop to reveal feathered branches from the remaining flowers. Hollow canes shed to reveal a lighter smooth cane which is quite brittle.
Japanese Knotweed Fallopia japonica is a fast growing strong perennial which was introduced to the UK from Japan in the 19th Century. It is often found widespread across roadside verges, riverbanks, woodland and towns and gardens.
Appleby Environmental Services Ltd specialise in the chemical treatment of Japanese knotweed through the methods of herbicidal spray and stem injection.
applebyenvironmental@aol.com

Invasive Weed Control

Ecological Contractors

Vegetation Clearance